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It should therefore be treated with caution by social professionals. Skip to Main Content.


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Search in: This Journal Anywhere. Advanced search. Submit an article Journal homepage. Derek Clifford Correspondence derekclifford btinternet. Pages Published online: 14 Jun Article Metrics Views.

It argues for what It argues for what can be called a care-based epistemology modelled on the now-familiar care ethics. We are women, we are men. We are refugees, single mothers, people with disabilities, and queers. We belong to social categories that frame their action, self-understanding, and life options. But what But what are social categories? How are they created and sustained?

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How does one come to belong to them? To answer these questions is to offer a metaphysics of social categories, and that is the project of Categories We Live By. The key component in the story offered is a theory of what it is for a feature of an individual to be socially meaningful in a context. People have a myriad of features, but only some of them make a difference socially in the contexts people travel.

The author gives an account of what it is for a feature of an individual to matter socially in a given context. This the author does by introducing a conferralist framework to carve out a theory of social meaning, and then uses the framework to offer a theory of social construction, and of the construction of sex, gender, race, disability, and other social categories. Accompanying is also a theory of social identity that brings out the role of individual agency in the formation and maintenance of social categories.

Lisa Tessman

In her fresh and revealing readings of the films, the author takes up pressing issues of masculinity as it is caught up in the very definition of ideas of revenge, violence, moral repair, and justice. Eastwood grapples with this involvement of masculinity in and through many of the great symbols of American life, including cowboys, boxing, police dramas, and ultimately war—perhaps the single greatest symbol of what it means or is supposed to mean to be a man.

Her book is not a traditional book of film criticism or a cinematographic biography. Rather, it is a work of social commentary and ethical philosophy. In a world in which we seem to be losing our grip on shared symbols, along with community itself, Eastwood's films work with the fragmented symbols that remain to us in order to engage masculinity with the most profound moral and ethical issues facing us today. In Coming to Life: Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering, 16 authors— including both established feminists and some of today's most innovative new scholars— engage in sustained In Coming to Life: Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering, 16 authors— including both established feminists and some of today's most innovative new scholars— engage in sustained reflections on the experiences of pregnancy, childbirth and mothering, and on the beliefs, customs, and political institutions by which those experiences are informed.

Many chapters reveal the radical shortcomings of convention philosophical wisdom by placing trenchant assumptions about subjectivity, gender, power and virtue in dialogue with women's experience. All readers, regardless of their philosophical training and commitments, will find much to appreciate in this volume. In Coming to Life: Philosophies of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering , 16 authors— including both established feminists and some of today's most innovative new scholars— engage in sustained reflections on the experiences of pregnancy, childbirth and mothering, and on the beliefs, customs, and political institutions by which those experiences are informed.

Gossip as a Burdened Virtue | SpringerLink

Through her Through her letters and those of her correspondents it offers a unique glimpse of the connections between radical republicanism and dissent in London, and throws light on the origins of parliamentary reform in Great Britain. It shows Macaulay and her friends to have been inspired by positive notions of liberty and by ideals of democratic republicanism, thought of as systems of equal government committed to universal benevolence, in which the common good would become the common care.

Debates about pornography have raged since the sexual revolution of the s, and the explosive spread in recent years of sexually explicit images across the Internet has only fueled the Debates about pornography have raged since the sexual revolution of the s, and the explosive spread in recent years of sexually explicit images across the Internet has only fueled the disagreements. Politicians, judges, clergy, citizen activists, and academics have weighed in on the issues. In this volume, two philosophers add their voices to the debate.

PNTV: The Nicomachean Ethics by Aristotle

Their views conflict in crucial ways. Altman argues that there is an individual right to create and view pornographic images, rooted in a basic right to sexual autonomy. Central to their disagreement is whether there is sufficient evidence that pornography harms women to justify laws aimed at suppressing the production and circulation of such material. Jessica Flanigan Jessica Flanigan argues that sex work should be fully decriminalized. Watson defends the Nordic Model on the grounds that prostitution is an exploitative and unequal practice that entrenches existing patterns of gendered injustice.

Watson also argues that full decriminalization of prostitution is incompatible with existing occupational health and safety standards and securing worker autonomy and equality. Watson further argues that sex trafficking and prostitution are functionally similar such that the distinction is irrelevant for public policy; attacking demand is necessary to address the inequalities that fuel both. Flanigan argues that sex work should be decriminalized because restrictions on the sale and purchase of sex violate the rights of sex workers and their clients.

Flanigan also suggests that decriminalization would have better consequences than policies that expose sex workers and their clients to criminal penalties, and that once we consider that public officials can also stand in relations of subordination to citizens, decriminalization is a more egalitarian approach than alternative policies.

Gossip as a Burdened Virtue

Decolonizing Universalism develops a way forward for genuinely anti-imperialist feminisms. Against ways of thinking that suggest feminists must either reject normativity altogether or bite the bullet Against ways of thinking that suggest feminists must either reject normativity altogether or bite the bullet and treat feminism as a product of Western chauvinism, the book offers a universalist conception of feminism that is not grounded in imperialism-causing values.

Insisting that transnational, postcolonial, and decolonial feminisms criticize imperialism rather than valorize of cultural diversity as such, Khader advocates shifting the terms of feminist debates about imperialism. Khader offers a nonideal universalist conception of transnational feminist praxis, that understands feminism as opposition to sexist oppression and transnational feminist praxis as a justice-enhancing project. In spite of the affinities of work by Simone de Beauvoir and Luce Irigaray, rarely are their projects productively put into dialogue. This groundbreaking volume is the first book-length work to This groundbreaking volume is the first book-length work to attempt to do so.

In so doing, it moves beyond the terms of a simple opposition: that Beauvoir advocates for a humanistic equality of subjects while Irigaray advocates for an exploration of the inherently sexuate specificity of bodies. Until now the strength of this oppositional reading has prevented scholars from asking what they have in common. To read Beauvoir and Irigaray together in a way that does justice to the work of both requires a continuation of efforts to read Beauvoir anew.

The essays in the second section of the volume take up the challenge of articulating points of dialogue in logic, ethics, and politics. Rather than forming a consensus or polarization either between Beauvoir and Irigaray or among each other, these essays deepen our understanding of the most familiar aspects and renew critical investigation of underappreciated moments of the work of these thinkers. This book argues for the moral and political promise of disorientations, challenging common philosophical understandings of the necessity of orientedness for responsible moral action.

In the face of In the face of difficult life experiences like trauma, grief, illness, migration, education, queer identification, and consciousness-raising, individuals can be deeply disoriented, struggling to know how to go on. These and other disorientations are not rare. The book draws on first-person accounts, philosophical texts, and qualitative and quantitative research to show that in some cases of disorientation, individuals gain new forms of awareness of political complexity and social norms, and new habits of relating to others and an unpredictable moral landscape. It then argues for the moral and political promise of these gains.

In philosophy, disorientations have been treated for the most part obliquely, as experiences avoidable and best avoided.

This book goes into different literatures from scholarship on Holocaust testimony to ideal and nonideal theory. This work also includes feminist care ethics, as well as debates about moral demandingness. In her work, Tessman tries to make sense of how moral requirements that are contradicting can carry moral authority.

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